Bathroom Cabinet Doors

Bathroom Cabinet Doors

Give your kitchen a new look with kitchen cabinet refacing Give your kitchen a new look and avoid a complete remodel by keeping your existing cabinets and simply replacing the doors and hardware. This guide will explain the refacing options available so you can find the style that’s most compatible with your home. SHOP ALL KITCHEN CABINETS Update Cabinet Doors Select new cabinet doors made from solid wood, rigid thermofoil or bamboo. Then, choose your overlay style. Solid wood Available in maple, cherry and oak Can be personalized with finishes, stains, paint and glazes Rigid thermofoil Thin, layered plastic coating fused to medium density fiberboard (MDF) with heat and pressure Available in a wide range of colors and styles Bamboo Attractive and an eco-friendly renewable resource Available in a large selection of bamboo finishes An overlay is how the cabinet doors lay on the cabinet face. There are two overlay styles. Standard overlays (aka “traditional” overlays) leave the face of the cabinet box visible around doors and drawers, creating a type of frame. Full overlays have the cabinet doors mounted so they completely cover the cabinet box with virtually no cabinet frame showing around doors and drawer fronts. Cabinet Hardware Hardware such as cabinet hinges, handles, knobs and pulls can make your cabinets function more easily and are a finishing touch to define your décor. The type of cabinet you have partly determines the type of hinges used on it. Framed cabinets have hinges attached to the door and the frame, while frameless cabinets have hinges attached to the door and the wall. European (“concealed”) hinges are not visible when the door is closed. They provide a sleek, clean appearance and are often used with contemporary styles. Most of these hinges are self-closing and commonly limit the door to opening 110 degrees. European hinges are always used on full overlay cabinet doors or frameless cabinets. Traditional (“exposed”) hinges show on the outside of the cabinet and are used with traditional cabinet styles. Types include spring-loaded self-closing barrel hinges and knife hinges, which allow the door to open 180 degrees. Cabinet handles or pulls come in a variety of styles and materials, from plastic and wood to ceramic and crystal. Most come in matching combinations with knobs for doors and handles for doors and drawers.
bathroom cabinet doors 1

Bathroom Cabinet Doors

Update Cabinet Doors Select new cabinet doors made from solid wood, rigid thermofoil or bamboo. Then, choose your overlay style. Solid wood Available in maple, cherry and oak Can be personalized with finishes, stains, paint and glazes Rigid thermofoil Thin, layered plastic coating fused to medium density fiberboard (MDF) with heat and pressure Available in a wide range of colors and styles Bamboo Attractive and an eco-friendly renewable resource Available in a large selection of bamboo finishes An overlay is how the cabinet doors lay on the cabinet face. There are two overlay styles. Standard overlays (aka “traditional” overlays) leave the face of the cabinet box visible around doors and drawers, creating a type of frame. Full overlays have the cabinet doors mounted so they completely cover the cabinet box with virtually no cabinet frame showing around doors and drawer fronts. Cabinet Hardware Hardware such as cabinet hinges, handles, knobs and pulls can make your cabinets function more easily and are a finishing touch to define your décor. The type of cabinet you have partly determines the type of hinges used on it. Framed cabinets have hinges attached to the door and the frame, while frameless cabinets have hinges attached to the door and the wall. European (“concealed”) hinges are not visible when the door is closed. They provide a sleek, clean appearance and are often used with contemporary styles. Most of these hinges are self-closing and commonly limit the door to opening 110 degrees. European hinges are always used on full overlay cabinet doors or frameless cabinets. Traditional (“exposed”) hinges show on the outside of the cabinet and are used with traditional cabinet styles. Types include spring-loaded self-closing barrel hinges and knife hinges, which allow the door to open 180 degrees. Cabinet handles or pulls come in a variety of styles and materials, from plastic and wood to ceramic and crystal. Most come in matching combinations with knobs for doors and handles for doors and drawers.
bathroom cabinet doors 2

Bathroom Cabinet Doors

Last night I did something that I’ve wanted to do for quite a long time.  I figured out how to make cabinet doors without using any kind of special tools! Now don’t get me wrong.  These do require tools.  But they only require standard tools that most DIYers would already have, like a circular saw, a miter saw, and a brad nailer (a nail gun that shoots small 18-gauge finishing nails).  However, they don’t require any of the specialty tools (or skills) that generally only the pros, the cabinet makers, and the long-time, almost-pro hobbyists have, like joiners, routers, etc. I didn’t get my doors and drawer fronts completely finished (because I’m incredibly math-challenged), but here’s how one of my finished doors turned out… It’s a vast improvement over the original doors, don’t you think? My original plan was to just add some pretty trim to the existing doors and drawers, and then paint everything.  That definitely would have improved the doors, but there are two reasons I decided not to go that direction. The existing doors and drawers have these weird beveled edges that bevel towards the cabinet.  I guess those bevels were created in lieu of having handles and knobs.  The beveled edges almost act as a “pull”.  Quite simply, I hate the way it looks. The existing doors and drawers are 3/4″ thick, so adding trim to the fronts would make even thicker…so thick, in fact, that the door fronts would extend past the edge of the countertop.  There’s just something not right about that. So I decided to just make brand new cabinet doors from scratch.  But since I’m limited in both tools and knowledge, I had to make do with my basic tools and general DIY knowledge.  And I’m actually really pleased with the outcome!  Here’s how I made my cabinet doors… I started out by using my circular saw to cut pieces of 1/2″ plywood to the finished size of my doors and drawers, minus 1/4″.  So my biggest door needed to be around 19 3/4″ wide by 19 3/4″ high, and I cut the plywood to 19 1/2″ by 19 1/2″. Next, I used my miter saw to cut pieces of cabinet trim to frame the pieces of plywood.  The trim I used came from Home Depot, and it’s sold in the area where you buy it by the piece, not by the linear foot. Then I attached the trim using wood glue and my brad nailer with 3/4″ brads. That did a great job at dressing up the front, but obviously I had to do something to cover up the edges since you can see where the plywood edge meets the trim. So next I took this really small trim (I have no idea what this is for, but it’s incredibly cheap, and rounded on both edges), and cut pieces to cover the edges of the door. I mitered the corners, and attached it to the edges of the door with wood glue and my brad nailer with the 3/4″ finishing nails. See how nicely it disguises the edge? And the last step is to add wood filler to the nail holes and the tiny spaces between the front trim and the edge trim.  Once everything was sanded down, the two pieces of trim actually looked like one continuous piece of trim. And the thickness turned out perfectly!  The thickness of the new door is only slightly more than the thickness of the old door. Now I just need to head back to Home Depot today and get more trim.  Gah!  I hate it when I don’t get enough supplies to finish my project!!  If I had purchased enough, I could have easily finished making these doors and drawer fronts yesterday.  They’re so simple and fairly quick to make. So, that’s where I’ll leave you today.    Once again, you’ll have to use your goggles to imagine how this will look once all of the doors and drawer fronts are added, and it’s all prettied up with paint and pretty handles. Speaking of cabinet hardware…. I generally use knobs on doors, and pulls on drawers.  But this time, I’ve decided to use these pretty pulls on both the doors and the drawers.  Is that strange?  Have you ever used pulls on doors?  I know I’ve seen it before, but I don’t know if it’s a normal thing.  What do you think? UPDATE:  I finally finished all of the door and drawer fronts, and thought I’d add a picture for you to see.  It’s still not painted.  Hopefully I’ll get to that soon! FacebookPinterestTwitterGoogleMoreEmailPrintLinkedInReddit
bathroom cabinet doors 3

Bathroom Cabinet Doors

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Bathroom Cabinet Doors

Bathroom Cabinet Doors
Bathroom Cabinet Doors